Meet the Board: Jan Meyer

“I am a disciple of Jesus I make disciples. That’s who I am and that’s what I do.  And I wouldn’t have it any other way.” This is the greatest desire of my heart, and I try to use this identity statement as often as I can to make the decisions I have about how to use my time, energy and resources.

I currently serve as the Communications Director for the Camp Eagle Family of Camps, and work from our Glorieta, NM campus. I love Christian Camping, and this role allows me to serve in a vibrant, Christ-centered ministry and utilize a variety of the skills and experiences from my previous positions.  Before accepting this job a year ago, I had spent more than 20 years working at Abilene Christian University. My primary role there was as the Director of ACU Leadership Camps. Camp is where I began to cultivate my own deep spiritual practices, and camp is where I first began to add these practices into our curriculum for youth and those who led them. We expanded these experiences and teachings year-round with our college student staff. Some of the greatest joys of my life have come from living out the call to disciple others by allowing me to introduce them to formative reflection and practices no matter their age or life stage. While at ACU, I also served in numerous roles as part of the Student Life staff, ultimately serving as the Dean for Spiritual Formation where many of these practices were introduced to students, staff, and faculty.

This work focus might explain why I care so much about the mission of Eleven28 Ministries. Living as a disciple is challenging, When you add the call to leadership, the weight can feel like a burden. I carry the memories of many who have given up what they believed to be their calling after losing sight of the One who called them. I have walked this path myself, and I know the value of having people and practices who remind you of the most important thing…staying grounded in your own walk with the Lord before you step up to lead others.

I am relatively new to the formal practice of spiritual direction. My first experience in spiritual direction was an emotional one. Sessions were offered as part of a spiritual formation program in which I was enrolled, and I had heard so much positive about it that I decided I needed to try it…at least once, right? That was my plan…but God had something else in mind. I was in a period of considerable transition in this moment when I said yes, and it didn’t take long with my seasoned spiritual director before her gentle questions melted the façade that I’d been brqvely holding up to everyone in my life. Like I’ve done for most of the challenges in my life…putting one foot in front of the other, doing whatever it took to get the job done, and keeping a confident smile on my face that might belie my actual feelings. My trust in God meant that I could get through anything…just God and I… right? This first experience was so raw for me that I backed away for a while, uncertain that I could handle that level of vulnerability on a consistent basis. What called me back to spiritual direction was the realization that vulnerability is what I need to be fully known and fully loved, and that‘s the kind of disciple I want to be.

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